Community Hubs helping migrants make the grade

Assistant Minister for Children and Families, Michelle Landry, joined Woodridge North State School Queensland Community Hub migrants, for English class today.

“Migrants, refugee women and their children are among Australia’s most vulnerable people,” Minister Landry said.

“We know that learning English is a key contributor to better employment and educational outcomes, social participation levels and it helps provide people with an overall sense of belonging to the Australian community.”

“Classes like this, provided under the National Community Hubs Program, not only offer migrants essential skills, but also aim to connect them with schools, each other and with organisations that provide health, education and settlement support.”

The Government provides funding to 68 Community Hubs nationally.

Woodridge North State School’s Community Hub was one of the first established in 2014.

“The Coalition Government has made significant investments in policies that improve social cohesion and bring people together; Community Hubs are an outstanding example of this investment.

“Since 2014 we have put $11.5 million into Community Hubs which operate as a partnership between the Australian Government, the Scanlon Foundation and Community Hubs Australia.

“Community Hubs deliver on a range of Government priorities including employment, learning English, social participation and family safety.” Ms Landry said.

More information about Community Hubs can be found at communityhubs.org.au